Proprioception

Have you heard of this before? It is body awareness, knowing where your body parts are without having to look at them and knowing how much force to use. Without it, kids might hurt someone during tag because they push too hard, bump into people or have trouble bringing their spoon to their mouth without looking at it. They even might have difficulties staying in their seat at school.

The main issue nowadays? Screens. Kids don’t practice proprioceptive skills while staring at a screen. And with Canadian winters being so harsh, I need to be creative with Finns play indoors. This is one of the reasons I got him a balance board from Kimboo (Canadians only, for US readers see the Kinderfeets). He goes upside down, climbs and slides, he practices walking on an in- and decline, he wobbles on it and it helps with developing his balance.

Did you know that the most important time to develop a child’s proprioception is before they are six years old?

Some other activities to help are:
• Climbing stairs
• Crawling in boxes and through tunnels
• Catching/throwing
• Swimming
• Play doh
• Building forts

I love the indoor opportunities for climbing so I’m looking at getting him a pickler triangle for his second birthday to help develop this more!

For some more ideas on toys for your toddler, check out my blog post on the Top 5 Montessori inspired toys!